App Developers Get More Guidance for Complying With COPPA

After giving the mobile app industry a few years of heartburn over the breadth and ambiguity of its expanded Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule, the Federal Trade Commission has gradually begun to provide some much-needed clarity. Earlier this month, the FTC revised three portions of “Part H” in its online FAQs, which deal with how entities[...]

Continue Reading …

Can I Augment That? 5 Targets to Be Wary of When Making AR

With the steady growth of new tools for user-generated augmented reality, I’ve been fielding a ton of questions lately on whether it’s legally okay to augment particular content. In other words–if you’re not familiar with how AR works–they want to know if it’s permissible to associate certain digital content with a particular physical object (the[...]

Continue Reading …

Opportunity to Study Privacy Law in Amsterdam This Summer

I was asked to share the following information with my readers. Because I think it could be of interest to several of you, I agreed.  I received no compensation for it. The University of Amsterdam’s Institute for Information Law will be holding its second annual Summer Course on Privacy Law and Policy from July 7-11,[...]

Continue Reading …

Who Watches the Machines Watching You?

On March 13, 2014, I gave the special guest presentation at the Embedded Vision Alliance membership meeting on the Qualcomm campus in San Diego, California. Titled “Who Watches the Machines Watching You? Regulating Privacy in the Era of Machines That See”  (and delivered a week before Sen. Rand Paul’s ovation-inspiring speech in Berkeley on “watching[...]

Continue Reading …

I Need More of Your Feedback on Facial Recognition Privacy

As I reported in January of this year, I am participating on behalf of AugmentedReality.Org in the Privacy Multistakeholder Process for Facial Recognition Technology being held by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.  Between February and June of 2014, this collaborative gathering intends to hammer out a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the[...]

Continue Reading …

Augmented & Wearable Solutions to IoT Privacy Concerns

Government regulators are only beginning to draw lines of privacy around data accumulated by the Internet of Things–that emerging collection of installed and wearable networked devices that were featured so prominently at CES 2014. But could these same devices end up being part of the privacy solution? In September 2013, the FTC took its first[...]

Continue Reading …

Your Chance to Influence Facial Recognition Privacy Law!

On February 6, 2014, the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)–a division of the U.S. Department of Commerce–will hold the first in a series of meetings on facial recognition technology.  “The goal of the process,” says the NTIA, “is to develop a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the Consumer Privacy Bill of[...]

Continue Reading …

Is the Pentagon Laying the Foundation of an Augmented World?

The U.S. military gets around. It is deployed in every time zone on Earth, and must be prepared to deliver munitions with precision anywhere in the world, whenever called upon.  So it built the Global Positioning System of satellites to provide reliable geospatial coordinates both on earth and in orbit, and networked its computers together[...]

Continue Reading …

Walking in Snow: iBeacon, BLE, and Privacy

One of the lesser-heralded features in iOS7 is “iBeacon,” Apple’s implementation of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology. To the extent anyone is talking about this yet, iBeacon has been seen as a rival to the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology used by Samsung, or a convenient way to pipe coupons into your phone.  But history[...]

Continue Reading …

Common Law Invasion of Privacy Claims in Social Media [GUEST POST]

This article was principally authored by Adrean S. Taylor, a student at the University of Michigan Law School and a 2013 summer associate at Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP. The overall issue for courts addressing common law privacy claims is to determine if and when there is a reasonable expectation of privacy for the online[...]

Continue Reading …