Digital Justice in Detroit

Detroit-Digital-Justice-Coalition1

Earlier this week, I got the chance to speak at a Lawyers for the Creative Economy (LCE) Code event sponsored by Creative Many (formerly “ArtServe Michigan.”) The theme was “Cities, Privacy and IP in the Digital Now,” and I contributed some of my ideas about protecting artists’ intellectual property and creative uses for augmented and other digital media. The[...]

Continue Reading …

#Ebola vs. #HIPAA – Privacy During an Epidemic

credit:NIAID

This month, the Office for Civil Right of the US Department of Health and Human Services released a bulletin clarifying how the Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 applies “in light of the Ebola outbreak and other events.” The bottom line is that ” the protections of the Privacy[...]

Continue Reading …

Skeletons of Empires: A Scenario for AR in 2020 [Video]

Capture

Earlier today, I participated in an online panel discussion sponsored by IEEE called “Skeletons of Empires: A Scenario for AR in 2020.” This was part of IEEE’s series of discussions on the various possible ways in which augmented reality and related technologies (especially the mesh of interconnected sensors known as the Internet of Things) could be[...]

Continue Reading …

App Developers Get More Guidance for Complying With COPPA

After giving the mobile app industry a few years of heartburn over the breadth and ambiguity of its expanded Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule, the Federal Trade Commission has gradually begun to provide some much-needed clarity. Earlier this month, the FTC revised three portions of “Part H” in its online FAQs, which deal with how entities[...]

Continue Reading …

Can I Augment That? 5 Targets to Be Wary of When Making AR

Daniele Civello / flickr

With the steady growth of new tools for user-generated augmented reality, I’ve been fielding a ton of questions lately on whether it’s legally okay to augment particular content. In other words–if you’re not familiar with how AR works–they want to know if it’s permissible to associate certain digital content with a particular physical object (the[...]

Continue Reading …

Opportunity to Study Privacy Law in Amsterdam This Summer

Rode Hoed

I was asked to share the following information with my readers. Because I think it could be of interest to several of you, I agreed.  I received no compensation for it. The University of Amsterdam’s Institute for Information Law will be holding its second annual Summer Course on Privacy Law and Policy from July 7-11,[...]

Continue Reading …

Who Watches the Machines Watching You?

logo

On March 13, 2014, I gave the special guest presentation at the Embedded Vision Alliance membership meeting on the Qualcomm campus in San Diego, California. Titled “Who Watches the Machines Watching You? Regulating Privacy in the Era of Machines That See”  (and delivered a week before Sen. Rand Paul’s ovation-inspiring speech in Berkeley on “watching[...]

Continue Reading …

I Need More of Your Feedback on Facial Recognition Privacy

20140225_133126_005

As I reported in January of this year, I am participating on behalf of AugmentedReality.Org in the Privacy Multistakeholder Process for Facial Recognition Technology being held by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.  Between February and June of 2014, this collaborative gathering intends to hammer out a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the[...]

Continue Reading …

Augmented & Wearable Solutions to IoT Privacy Concerns

(c) keiichi matsuda

Government regulators are only beginning to draw lines of privacy around data accumulated by the Internet of Things–that emerging collection of installed and wearable networked devices that were featured so prominently at CES 2014. But could these same devices end up being part of the privacy solution? In September 2013, the FTC took its first[...]

Continue Reading …

Your Chance to Influence Facial Recognition Privacy Law!

On February 6, 2014, the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)–a division of the U.S. Department of Commerce–will hold the first in a series of meetings on facial recognition technology.  “The goal of the process,” says the NTIA, “is to develop a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the Consumer Privacy Bill of[...]

Continue Reading …