Wearable Devices as Copyright Enforcement Tools

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What if, instead of being a copyright infringement threat, wearable technology became copyright’s ultimate enforcement tool? Copyright enforcement will be a major challenge in the medium of augmented reality. The mass lawsuits of the past two decades against file-sharers and signal pirates have required a significant amount of detective work and discovery to connect individual[...]

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Can I Augment That? 5 Targets to Be Wary of When Making AR

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With the steady growth of new tools for user-generated augmented reality, I’ve been fielding a ton of questions lately on whether it’s legally okay to augment particular content. In other words–if you’re not familiar with how AR works–they want to know if it’s permissible to associate certain digital content with a particular physical object (the[...]

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Google Glass and the TSA

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Can you use Google Glass in the airport security line? The TSA does not have a specific policy on this, but it does have a general stance on taking photos and video of airport security checkpoints: TSA does not prohibit the public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping or filming at security checkpoints, as long[...]

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Floating Google Glass Stores? Unlikely. Instead, Follow the Patent.

Since October 25, when CNET reporter Daniel Terdiman first broke the story, the intertubes have been blowing up about the huge, mysterious barges that Google is apparently building in San Francisco, California and Portland, Maine.  (Will they find one orbiting Jupiter next?) This original story concluded that the San Francisco structure was most likely a “a sea-faring[...]

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This is the Future of Augmented Reality? Let’s Hope Not.

Creepy.  Deceptive.  Perhaps even misogynistic. These are not words you’d want associated with your industry.  Yet they are accurate descriptions of the lead characters in two wildly popular concept videos depicting users of augmented reality eyewear in the relatively near future. There are several similarities, and some important differences, between the two videos.  The first[...]

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Does Your Workplace Have a Sousveillance Policy?

Remember the good old days–like, last year–when all that most companies needed to know about their employee’s social media activity is that the company should have a policy about it?  Well, those halcyon days are long gone.  Now it’s only a matter of days before thousands of newly minted “Google Explorers” start wearing their Google[...]

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Augmented Reality as Free Speech – A First Amendment Analysis

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Does the First Amendment to the United States Constitution protect the right to augment reality? As with most legal questions about augmented reality (or “AR”), we can’t answer definitively, because no court has yet considered the issue.  But with consumer-level digital eyewear just around the corner, we will soon be faced with questions just like[...]

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5 Predictions for Augmented Reality Law in 2013 (and a Look Back at 2012)

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As a public radio commentator once said, augmented reality has “been the Next Big Thing for a while now, although it never manages to become the Actual Current Big Thing.”  In keeping with this Sisyphean observation, we did not (yet) see quite as much development in either AR technology or the law governing its use in[...]

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Augmented Reality Eyewear & the Problem of Porn [FROM THE ARCHIVES]

[This article was originally posted on May 2, 2012.] Regardless of your moral outlook, porn is a serious and growing sociological ill.  It may not be the same type of problem as crystal meth, child predators, or terrorism.  But it is a problem–and one that will get an order of magnitude worse when AR eyewear[...]

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