Can I Augment That? 5 Targets to Be Wary of When Making AR

With the steady growth of new tools for user-generated augmented reality, I’ve been fielding a ton of questions lately on whether it’s legally okay to augment particular content. In other words–if you’re not familiar with how AR works–they want to know if it’s permissible to associate certain digital content with a particular physical object (the[...]

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I Need More of Your Feedback on Facial Recognition Privacy

As I reported in January of this year, I am participating on behalf of AugmentedReality.Org in the Privacy Multistakeholder Process for Facial Recognition Technology being held by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.  Between February and June of 2014, this collaborative gathering intends to hammer out a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the[...]

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Your Chance to Influence Facial Recognition Privacy Law!

On February 6, 2014, the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)–a division of the U.S. Department of Commerce–will hold the first in a series of meetings on facial recognition technology.  ”The goal of the process,” says the NTIA, “is to develop a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the Consumer Privacy Bill of[...]

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Publicity Rights in Facial Recognition and Other Biometric Data

Widespread use of facial recognition technology is inevitable. To date, industry–leading companies have shown remarkable restraint in implementing such features. Google has banned facial recognition apps on its Glass headset, and Facebook has refrained from rolling out the technology to the degree that it could, although it’s inching further in that direction. But as digital[...]

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This is the Future of Augmented Reality? Let’s Hope Not.

Creepy.  Deceptive.  Perhaps even misogynistic. These are not words you’d want associated with your industry.  Yet they are accurate descriptions of the lead characters in two wildly popular concept videos depicting users of augmented reality eyewear in the relatively near future. There are several similarities, and some important differences, between the two videos.  The first[...]

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5 Predictions for Augmented Reality Law in 2013 (and a Look Back at 2012)

As a public radio commentator once said, augmented reality has “been the Next Big Thing for a while now, although it never manages to become the Actual Current Big Thing.”  In keeping with this Sisyphean observation, we did not (yet) see quite as much development in either AR technology or the law governing its use in[...]

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FTC Issues Best Practices for Facial Recognition Privacy

On October 22, 2012, the Federal Trade Commission released a report entitled “Facing Facts: Best Practices for Common Uses of Facial Recognition Technologies”.  The FTC has had its eye on this technology for a long time–at least since the workshop it held on the subject in December 2011–aware that it is being implemented by a[...]

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Augmented Reality, Political Groupthink, and Civil Society

Earlier this month, I wrote about one potential danger of immersive augmented reality–the potential for becoming addicted to it.  The chances for dependency will increase, I argued, the more ubiquitous the technology becomes, and the more we gain the ability to customize the augmented displays that we see.   Augmentation could then become narcissism and self-aggrandizement. There[...]

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