Reciprocal Veillance – Seeing Who’s Seeing You

Augmented reality could make one of the most meaningful contributions to personal privacy ever invented by allowing individuals to visualize how they’re being watched. This week I had the wonderful privilege of learning from, and tinkering with, the person on the forefront of making that happen: Dr. Steve Mann (with whom I recently collaborated on an […]

Michigan Court Adopts “No Harm, No Foul” Standard for Data Breaches

Unintended releases of personal information stored on company servers are among the most talked-about and litigated issues in technology law over the past few years. Because privacy is primarily an matter of state, rather than federal, law, however, the standards for evaluating these claims vary widely. Now my home state of Michigan has entered the debate by […]

My Top Posts in 2014

Not wanting to miss the bandwagon of year-end blogging, I present the following list of my most popular posts in 2014. The one you liked best from this year was Augmented Reality Gamer Detained By Police, which detailed the first reported (by someone else) instance of police finding an AR gamer’s activities sufficiently suspicious to warrant temporary detention. I […]

An “Open Carry” Movement for Wearable Cameras?

Forbes recently published an opinion piece that I co-authored with Dr. Steve Mann, who founded the MIT Wearable Computing Lab and is widely known as the father of wearable computing. Titled “Body Cameras For Police Officers; What About For Ordinary Citizens?,” our thesis is that body-worn cameras for police officers are only half the solution […]

Digital Justice in Detroit

Earlier this week, I got the chance to speak at a Lawyers for the Creative Economy (LCE) Code event sponsored by Creative Many (formerly “ArtServe Michigan.”) The theme was “Cities, Privacy and IP in the Digital Now,” and I contributed some of my ideas about protecting artists’ intellectual property and creative uses for augmented and other digital media. The […]

#Ebola vs. #HIPAA – Privacy During an Epidemic

This month, the Office for Civil Right of the US Department of Health and Human Services released a bulletin clarifying how the Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 applies “in light of the Ebola outbreak and other events.” The bottom line is that ” the protections of the Privacy […]

Can Augmented Reality Be a Weapon Against Ebola?

Joe Rampolla, the long-time commentator on AR legal and social issues, has a new article out today on his ARDirt blog called “Stopping the Spread of Ebola through Augmented Reality.” It’s an interesting piece. His thesis is that digital eyewear equipped with thermal imaging cameras would offer a much more efficient way to screen travelers […]

Skeletons of Empires: A Scenario for AR in 2020 [Video]

Earlier today, I participated in an online panel discussion sponsored by IEEE called “Skeletons of Empires: A Scenario for AR in 2020.” This was part of IEEE’s series of discussions on the various possible ways in which augmented reality and related technologies (especially the mesh of interconnected sensors known as the Internet of Things) could be […]

App Developers Get More Guidance for Complying With COPPA

After giving the mobile app industry a few years of heartburn over the breadth and ambiguity of its expanded Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule, the Federal Trade Commission has gradually begun to provide some much-needed clarity. Earlier this month, the FTC revised three portions of “Part H” in its online FAQs, which deal with how entities […]

FTC Testifies on Geolocation Privacy

Today the FTC released the following press release.  I reproduce it here, verbatim, because it’s a succinct summary and pertains to important and cutting-edge issues of geolocation privacy that we frequently address on this blog. The Federal Trade Commission testified before Congress on the Commission’s efforts to address the privacy concerns raised by the tracking […]