Augmented Assault

Fig. 7.1 Wassom

In common speech, the word “assault” is almost never heard apart from the term “battery” (or, occasionally, “a deadly Pepa“). We use the two words together in a phrase to describe a physical attack on a person. Because augmented reality deals with the non-corporeal, then, it may seem strange to suggest that one could use digital[...]

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AWE 2014 in Review

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That’s a wrap! The fifth annual Augmented World Expo took place last week in Santa Clara, California. As in prior years, this was the premier annual event in the industry, featuring speakers and exhibitors from the augmented reality field as well as from related endeavors–such as wearable technology–that make up the broader “augmented world.” USA[...]

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Augment Your Breakfast With Learning at AWE 2014

breakfast mtg flickr Michael Summers

Attending this year’s Augmented World Expo in Santa Clara? As the Culture Chair of the event, I’ve collaborated with the organizers to hold “Augmented Breakfast” round table discussions on each morning of the conference. Between 8:00-9:00 on Wednesday and Thursday mornings, gather with us in Ballroom G&H (near the registration desk) for a chance to[...]

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Ingress AR Game Impacting Kansas Law Enforcement?

(c) Brian Carpani / flickr

I recently stumbled across this post from a Kansas law enforcement lobbyist, originally posted in January 2014. It purports to describe “a number” of 911 calls in Park City about “suspicious persons” who turned out to be playing the augmented reality game Ingress. The article also cites one of my blog posts as an example[...]

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Wearable Devices as Copyright Enforcement Tools

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What if, instead of being a copyright infringement threat, wearable technology became copyright’s ultimate enforcement tool? Copyright enforcement will be a major challenge in the medium of augmented reality. The mass lawsuits of the past two decades against file-sharers and signal pirates have required a significant amount of detective work and discovery to connect individual[...]

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Can I Augment That? 5 Targets to Be Wary of When Making AR

Daniele Civello / flickr

With the steady growth of new tools for user-generated augmented reality, I’ve been fielding a ton of questions lately on whether it’s legally okay to augment particular content. In other words–if you’re not familiar with how AR works–they want to know if it’s permissible to associate certain digital content with a particular physical object (the[...]

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From the Archives: Augmented Reality as Free Speech

With the continued expansion of new AR-creation tools, I’ve been getting the question “Can I augment that?” a lot lately.  This post from April 2013 promises to be increasingly relevant in the near future. Does the First Amendment to the United States Constitution protect the right to augment reality? As with most legal questions about[...]

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I Need More of Your Feedback on Facial Recognition Privacy

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As I reported in January of this year, I am participating on behalf of AugmentedReality.Org in the Privacy Multistakeholder Process for Facial Recognition Technology being held by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.  Between February and June of 2014, this collaborative gathering intends to hammer out a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the[...]

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Google Glass and the TSA

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Can you use Google Glass in the airport security line? The TSA does not have a specific policy on this, but it does have a general stance on taking photos and video of airport security checkpoints: TSA does not prohibit the public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping or filming at security checkpoints, as long[...]

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More Voices Join the AR Law Conversation

Scott Peppet, Professor of Law at the University of Colorado Law School

I’ve enjoyed occupying the “AR Lawyer” niche for the past several years. My first piece on augmented reality law was published in 2007. I launched the Augmented Legality® portion of this blog in January 2011, where I’ve addressed the subject regularly ever since.  On top of that have been dozens of articles, interviews, and public[...]

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