Medical Implants and 3D Printing: Tomorrow’s Tech Meets Today’s Copyright Act

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The U.S. Copyright Office is in the midst of deciding whether to exempt certain emerging technologies from the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. And it’s not too late for you to do something about it. The following summary is borrowed, with permission, from Attorney Stefan M. Mentzer at White & Case. Background Every three[…]

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“Augmented Reality” By Any Other Name: Still as Sweet?

rose - flickr bitsorf

Augmented reality is dead. Long live augmented reality. It has long been predicted by some within the augmented reality community that AR will succeed when people stop calling it “augmented reality.”  By that measure, things are looking up. The last six months has seen a rapid increase in the amount of AR visualization technology entering[…]

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Top 5 Legal Issues in the Internet of Things, Part 5: Physical Safety

alberto racatumba / flickr

In this series of articles on the Internet of Things, we’ve examined two ways in which IoT devices can be intentionally abused (data security, invasion of privacy), and two systemic limitations that could impede the IoT’s growth (bandwidth overload and lack of interoperability between copyrighted software).  The final topic I will address in this series–physical[…]

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Top 5 Legal Issues in the Internet of Things, Part 4: Copyright

lego mashup flickr mike chernucha

Imagine a world in which each box of Lego® bricks you buy is a standalone toy–unable to combine with the bricks from any other set. That, of course, is the opposite of the real world. As was brilliantly depicted in 2014’s Lego Movie, actual kids exercise their creativity by combining the bricks from every set[…]

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Top 5 Legal Issues in the Internet of Things, Part 3: Bandwidth

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Over the past two weeks. I’ve written about the privacy implications of the Internet of Things (IoT), with respect to both data security and surreptitious collection of information. Today we consider a more mundane, but no less practical, aspect of the IoT explosion: bandwidth. Consider this: Cisco IBSG predicts there will be 25 billion devices connected to the[…]

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Top 5 Legal Issues in the Internet of Things, Part 2: Data Collection and Invasion of Privacy

CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Last week I wrote about the incredibly lax privacy protections used in most Internet of Things (IoT) devices, and how vulnerable they are to hacking. Users are allowing more and more of their health, commercial, and other data to be stored in IoT devices, and the potential of the data being hacked into and misused is ever-present. A closely related,[…]

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Top 5 Legal Issues in the Internet of Things, Part 1: Data Security & Privacy

iot privact - ftc

“The Internet of Things” (or IoT) is an increasingly popular shorthand term for the emerging arrangement of physical devices (other than what we’d typically think of as “computers”) that come equipped with wireless internet connectivity. Examples include smart thermostats, smart doorbells, smart refrigerators, smart cars–pretty much anything that marketers feel the need to insert the prefix “smart” in[…]

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Introducing the World’s First Book on Augmented Reality Law!

cover

After many months of work, I’m pleased to announce that Augmented Reality Law, Privacy, and Ethics is now available from Elsevier. This 360-page book incorporates and updates the analysis I’ve been publishing in this Augmented Legality® blog for the past four years, and expands the discussion into new subjects not previously covered. <br /> This table of contents[…]

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Reciprocal Veillance – Seeing Who’s Seeing You

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Augmented reality could make one of the most meaningful contributions to personal privacy ever invented by allowing individuals to visualize how they’re being watched. This week I had the wonderful privilege of learning from, and tinkering with, the person on the forefront of making that happen: Dr. Steve Mann (with whom I recently collaborated on an[…]

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Michigan Court Adopts “No Harm, No Foul” Standard for Data Breaches

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Unintended releases of personal information stored on company servers are among the most talked-about and litigated issues in technology law over the past few years. Because privacy is primarily an matter of state, rather than federal, law, however, the standards for evaluating these claims vary widely. Now my home state of Michigan has entered the debate by[…]

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