Congress Praises AR’s Potential and Will Try to Stay Out of Its Way

Breaking Down the Senate's First Hearing on Augmented Reality

“They weren’t just playing a game; they were experiencing augmented reality.” That’s how North Dakota Senator and Committee Chairman John Thune summarized the experience of Pokemon Go players in remarks that opened Congress’ first hearing on augmented reality Wednesday. And it was an apt summary of the hearing itself. Before hearing testimony from five witnesses, […]

The First Congressional Hearing on Augmented Reality

When I launched my Augmented Legality blog in 2011, I didn’t know anyone outside a very select group of entrepreneurs and technologists who even knew what augmented reality was. But I shared with the members of that then-fledgling industry a vision that AR would soon revolutionize society as much as the internet had already done. […]

Second Life Redux: Another Perspective on Potentially Deceptive Advertising in Virtual Reality

Piotr Kulaga, a UX Analyst & Designer in Sydney, Australia, has been reading this blog about as long as anyone. His time in the digital media industry gives perspective, and he shared the following thoughts about my recent post on False Advertising in VR that I thought were worth sharing.  Here they are, reproduced from his […]

Website Owners Beware — Ignoring This Rule Could Leave You on the Hook for Someone Else’s Copyright Infringement

Every company whose website or other online service contains any third-party content needs to be aware of a new regulation issued by the U.S. Copyright Office. The new rule, which takes effect December 1, 2016, alters the hoops through which website owners and other internet service providers must jump in order to avoid being held […]

Virtual Reality Could Expose Automotive Companies to New Claims of False Advertising

This post also appears on Ahead of the Curve, the definitive law blog for navigating the automotive supply chain, from Warner Norcross & Judd LLP. Automotive suppliers and manufacturers around the world are getting in on the virtual and augmented reality bandwagon. The CEO of Jaguar Land Rover North America, for example, recently revealed that […]

Lawsuit Filed Against Snapchat for Distracted Driving

"Miles Per Hour" Filter Blamed for Crash

Snapchat’s “miles per hour” filter allows users to overlay their selfies with a stamp showing how fast they were going at the time. App users around the world have been criticized for posting photos they made with the filter while driving at over 100 mph. Teenager Christal McGee is alleged to have caused a near-fatal accident doing […]

Snap Into a Privacy Lawsuit!

Spectacles About to Introduce a New Generation to Eavesdropping, Intrusion Into Seclusion

Snap (nee Snapchat) has just announced Spectacles, a funky pair of sunglasses with built-in video recording capability. Exactly like Google Glass before it, users can tap a button to activate a forward-facing camera in the corner of the frames for 10 seconds, and tap it again to extend the recording. Unlike Glass, they’ll cost less than […]

Privacy Regulators Are Zeroing in on the Internet of Things

IAPP
September 22, 2016

Privacy regulators across the globe are beginning to realize what the industry has known for a long time: IoT devices are woefully insecure. It can only be a matter of time before enforcement agencies introduce tough new requirements for data security and disclosures. Companies that fail to anticipate these developments will find themselves at a sever disadvantage.

Congress Moves to Protect Critical Social Media Reviews

CNN Money
September 13, 2016

Last week, the House of Representatives passed the Consumer Review Fairness Act, which is intended to prohibit businesses from suing individuals for posting honest, but negative, online reviews. This bill makes a provision of a form contract void from the inception if it is used in the course of selling or leasing goods or services to: (1) prohibit or restrict an individual who is a party to such a contract from engaging in written, oral, or pictorial reviews, or other similar performance assessments or analyses of, including by electronic means, the goods, services, or conduct of a person that is also a party to the contract; (2) impose penalties or fees against individuals who engage in such communications; or (3) transfer or require the individual to transfer intellectual property rights in review or feedback content (with the exception of a nonexclusive license to use the content) in any otherwise lawful communications about such person or the goods or services provided by such person.

The legislation goes on to make clear that it does not apply to employment contracts, nor is it meant to prohibit other common terms of use provisions, such as those against harassment or defamatory speech.

The intent of this law is laudable. It will be interesting to see how the final language comes together and, if signed into law, how it is applied.

Finding Friends is Fraught With Privacy Peril

Yelp's Loss Spells Legal Trouble for the Mobile App Industry

On Friday, September 8, Yelp became the latest mobile application maker to be held to account for potentially violating users’ privacy. The plaintiffs in a long-running class action lawsuit allege that Yelp and other app developers improperly uploaded address book data from their phones without their consent. The court’s ruling on Friday denied Yelp’s motion for summary […]