Introducing the World’s First Book on Augmented Reality Law!

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After many months of work, I’m pleased to announce that Augmented Reality Law, Privacy, and Ethics is now available from Elsevier. This 360-page book incorporates and updates the analysis I’ve been publishing in this Augmented Legality® blog for the past four years, and expands the discussion into new subjects not previously covered. <br /> This table of contents[…]

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Reciprocal Veillance – Seeing Who’s Seeing You

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Augmented reality could make one of the most meaningful contributions to personal privacy ever invented by allowing individuals to visualize how they’re being watched. This week I had the wonderful privilege of learning from, and tinkering with, the person on the forefront of making that happen: Dr. Steve Mann (with whom I recently collaborated on an[…]

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Michigan Court Adopts “No Harm, No Foul” Standard for Data Breaches

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Unintended releases of personal information stored on company servers are among the most talked-about and litigated issues in technology law over the past few years. Because privacy is primarily an matter of state, rather than federal, law, however, the standards for evaluating these claims vary widely. Now my home state of Michigan has entered the debate by[…]

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My Top Posts in 2014

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Not wanting to miss the bandwagon of year-end blogging, I present the following list of my most popular posts in 2014. The one you liked best from this year was Augmented Reality Gamer Detained By Police, which detailed the first reported (by someone else) instance of police finding an AR gamer’s activities sufficiently suspicious to warrant temporary detention. I[…]

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An “Open Carry” Movement for Wearable Cameras?

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Forbes recently published an opinion piece that I co-authored with Dr. Steve Mann, who founded the MIT Wearable Computing Lab and is widely known as the father of wearable computing. Titled “Body Cameras For Police Officers; What About For Ordinary Citizens?,” our thesis is that body-worn cameras for police officers are only half the solution[…]

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LinkedIn Lawsuit Again Shows Personal Relationships Can Have Commercial Value

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I have argued for years that social media will help redefine and expand the right of publicity–that common-law right to control the commercial exploitation of one’s personal identity–because the entire medium is premised on users’ identities. We saw a major milestone in this regard with the 2011 decisions in Cohen v. Facebook and Fraley v.[…]

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You’re Responsible for Copyright Infringement By Others on Your Website–Unless You’ve Done This

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There’s a common misconception among website owners that they are not responsible for content that others post on their website.  The truth is that, although it is possible for website owners to shield themselves from liability, there are certain hoops they need to jump through first. And if you don’t take those steps before someone posts[…]

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Instagram Harassment Justifies a PPO

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As has been extensively reported, the Supreme Court recently heard argument on a case involving threats made on Facebook, which raises the question of where the line is between free speech and criminal liability. But this is not a one-time-only issue. Courts across the country deal with the consequences of unchecked online speech all the[…]

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Infographic: Copyright on the Internet

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This week’s post is brought to you courtesy of NeoMam Studios, which provided the following infographic (original here) summarizing some of the most significant events related to online copyright law. (Inexplicably, however, the 1999 publication of my law review note on the subject didn’t make the cut. I call shenanigans!) Thanks to NeoMam, and Happy[…]

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Digital Justice in Detroit

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Earlier this week, I got the chance to speak at a Lawyers for the Creative Economy (LCE) Code event sponsored by Creative Many (formerly “ArtServe Michigan.”) The theme was “Cities, Privacy and IP in the Digital Now,” and I contributed some of my ideas about protecting artists’ intellectual property and creative uses for augmented and other digital media. The[…]

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